Has Apple lost its way?

Has Apple lost its way?

Wow, after reading the reviews on apples own site, it’s apparent that there are MAJOR issues with Lion. I have to admit, i was a little envious when i saw the nifty interface applied to the mac address book, but i’ve had limited exposure other than that. Hell, I stopped watching the keynotes when Steve stopped doing them. This was the first year i didn’t even check the news on what happened durring the Apple WWDC. And I was once the guy who would drive to the Apple store to wach it broadcast there! But if this is any indicator, the feedback looks pretty disastrous.

It even has me wondering if i outfit my upcoming studio with new Macs! 

My new favorite Wikipedia article!

My new favorite Wikipedia article!

read the whole article here.

Dr_Wisz at Flickr

While the process of recording a mix onto an audio cassette from LPs or compact discs is technically straightforward, many music fans who create more than one mix tape are eventually compelled to confront some of the practical and aesthetic challenges involved in the mix tape format. From a practical standpoint, such issues as avoiding an excessive amount of blank tape at the end of one side (which requires careful planning of the length of each side of the mix) and reducing the audible click between songs (which requires mastery of the pause button on the cassette recorder) have been identified as part of the shared experience of mix tape aficionados. From an aesthetic point of view, many enthusiasts believe that because a tape player, unlike a CD player, lacks the ability to skip from song to song, the mix tape needs to be considered in its entirety. This requires the mix tape creator to consider the transitions between songs, the effects caused by juxtaposing a soft song with a loud song, and the overall “narrative arc” of the entire tape. One notable listing of such aesthetic “rules” can be found in a paragraph from High Fidelity:

   

Mixtape

To me, making a tape is like writing a letter — there’s a lot of erasing and rethinking and starting again. A good compilation tape, like breaking up, is hard to do. You’ve got to kick off with a corker, to hold the attention (I started with “Got to Get You Off My Mind,” but then realized that she might not get any further than track one, side one if I delivered what she wanted straightaway, so I buried it in the middle of side two), and then you’ve got to up it a notch, or cool it a notch, and you can’t have white music and black music together, unless the white music sounds like black music, and you can’t have two tracks by the same artist side by side, unless you’ve done the whole thing in pairs and…oh, there are loads of rules.